This is a one-day interactive course on model-based observer design. The aim is to determine which states and parameters of an observer model can be estimated with reasonable accuracy from available measurements. This can be established using observability theory. Once observability is established, development of Kalman filters will be discussed to estimate the unknown states and parameters. The grinding mill from the mineral processing industry will be used as the main illustrative example. At the end of the event, attendees will be equipped to assess the observability of the states and parameters of a process model, and apply an Extended Kalman Filter to estimate the unknowns.

Contact Alfred at alfred.schroder@aurecongroup.com for further information regarding the course.

More information on this event

WHO SHOULD ATTEND

The workshop will be useful to both specifiers and implementers and will provide a theoretical grounding as well as a practical guide for preparing control system functional specification documentation for implementation on Industrial control systems consisting of DCS (Distributed Control Systems), PLC (Programmable Logic Controllers) and HMI (Human Machine Interfaces / SCADA devices).

Experienced and novice process and control systems engineers and technicians who wish to gain an understanding of the ISA 5.06.01 Standards for Control System Functional Requirements Documentation and the new ISA 101 High Performance HMI standard.

PROGRAMME

8:30 to 9:00 Registration (tea/coffee)

Session 1 : Introduction – The importance of producing a control system FDS before software programming and configuration begins.

Session 2 : ISA 5.06.01 Standards for Control System Functional Requirements – Brief overview of the  International Society of Automation’s standard for control system functional requirements documentation and it’s relevance to the workshop.

Session 3 : Definitions – Essential industry terms and abbreviations to be used in the FDS.

10:30 to 10:45 Tea/coffee

Session 4 : Tagging and Naming Conventions Essential equipment naming (Tagging) conventions and their use throughout the control system. 

Session 5: Control Philosophy – Review of the role of the Process Engineer’s Process Control Philosophy in guiding the FDS. A typical control unit will be described.

Session 6 : Control System requirements -Defining the requirements for the Control System i.e. PLC coding concepts.

12:30 to 13:15 Light Lunch

Session 7 : ISA 101 Standards for Human Machine Interfaces – Defining the requirements for High Performance HMI i.e.. HMI /SCADA configuration concepts, style guide, life cycle.

Session 8 : Reporting Requirements

Defining the requirements for Control System reporting and presentation of reports.

15:30 Summary, closeout and evaluation.

ENQUIRIES & INFORMATION

8:30 to 9:00 Registration (tea/coffee)

Session 1 : Introduction – The importance of producing a control system FDS before software programming and configuration begins.

Session 2 : ISA 5.06.01 Standards for Control System Functional Requirements – Brief overview of the  International Society of Automation’s standard for control system functional requirements documentation and it’s relevance to the workshop.

Session 3 : Definitions – Essential industry terms and abbreviations to be used in the FDS.

10:30 to 10:45 Tea/coffee

Session 4 : Tagging and Naming Conventions Essential equipment naming (Tagging) conventions and their use throughout the control system. 

Session 5: Control Philosophy – Review of the role of the Process Engineer’s Process Control Philosophy in guiding the FDS. A typical control unit will be described.

Session 6 : Control System requirements -Defining the requirements for the Control System i.e. PLC coding concepts.

12:30 to 13:15 Light Lunch

Session 7 : ISA 101 Standards for Human Machine Interfaces – Defining the requirements for High Performance HMI i.e.. HMI /SCADA configuration concepts, style guide, life cycle.

Session 8 : Reporting Requirements

Defining the requirements for Control System reporting and presentation of reports.

15:30 Summary, closeout and evaluation.